Out of the hospital, but not out of the woods

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk for acutely ill medical patients is highest in the first 30 days, starting with hospital admission.1

LEARN MORE

Out of the hospital, but not out of the woods

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk for acutely ill medical patients is highest in the first 30 days, starting with hospital admission.1

LEARN MORE

.

Out of the hospital, but not out of the woods

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk for acutely ill medical patients is highest in the first 30 days, starting with hospital admission.1

LEARN MORE

VTE risk is highest in the first 30 days, starting with hospital admission1

Cumulative risk of VTE in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients
through 180 days post-admission (N=11,139)1

Mean Hospital Stay: 5.3 (±5.3) Days Greatest VTE Risk: Days 0-30 52.6% of cumulative 6-month VTE risk occurs by day 30 100 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 0.000 0.007 0.014 0.021 0.028 0.035 6 9 12 17 23 41 56 95 120 180 DAYS AFTER INITIAL HOSPITALIZATION 180-DAYS CUMULATIVE PROBABLILITY (%) CUMULATIVE PROBABILITY OF VTE
52.6% of cumulative 6-mo VTE risk occurs by day 30
VTE Webnar

Register for the webinar*
Venous Thromboembolism: Pervasive, Persistent, Preventable

First in a series of live peer-to-peer webinars about the unmet need for VTE prophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients after hospital discharge.

*For US health care professionals only.

Too often, VTE is a silent killer2,3

For 1 in 4 patients, a fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) is the first symptom of VTE4

VTE risk for acutely ill medical patients is highest

Acutely ill medical patients

A vulnerable population with limited options

Shared risk factors5

Immobility, hypercoagulability, and inflammation are shared risk factors for various types of acutely ill medical patients.
VTE Newsletter Signup

Register for updates*

Concerned about your acutely ill medical patients and VTE?
Sign up to receive updates and access to new resources as they become available.

*For US health care professionals only.

Current guidelines do not recommend extended-duration prophylaxis for acutely ill medical patients because prior trials have failed to identify a positive benefit-risk balance6,7

Read the guidelines6:

American College of Chest Physicians
References
  1. Amin AN, Varker H, Princic N, Lin J, Thompson S, Johnston S. Duration of venous thromboembolism risk across a continuum in medically ill hospitalized patients. J Hosp Med. 2012;7(3):231-238.
  2. Futterman LG, Lemberg L. A silent killer—often preventable. Am J Crit Care. 2004;13(5):431-436.
  3. Office of the Surgeon General and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (US). The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism. Rockville, MD: Office of the Surgeon General (US); 2008.
  4. Beckman MG, Hooper WC, Critchley SE, Ortel TL. Venous thromboembolism: a public health concern. Am J Prev Med. 2010;38(4S):S495-S501.
  5. DiNisio M, Porreca E. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2013;7:973-980.
  6. Khan SR, Lim W, Dunn AS, et al. Prevention of VTE in nonsurgical patients: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest. 2012;141(2 suppl):e195S-e226S.
  7. Korjian S, Daaboul Y, Halaby R, et al. Extended-duration thromboprophylaxis among acute medically ill patients: an unmet need. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2016;21(3):227-232.